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How We Labor: Building a New Social Contract for Jobs and Working People - A HENRY COHEN LECTURE

Tuesday, November 27, 2018 at 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

The Auditorium, Room A106, Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall 66 West 12th Street, New York, NY 10011

Should we have a public option for jobs? How can we build workplace democracy? Should workers run their own enforcement systems? Can our economy offer workers more options through coops and other alternative job models? These themes and more will be explored in a conversation on how to transform labor featuring Pablo Benson-Silva of the New York City Network of Worker Cooperatives; Darrick Hamilton, director of the doctoral program in public and urban policy, and professor of economics and urban policy at The Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment and the Department of Economics, The New School; and Cathy Albisa, executive director of National Economic and Social Rights Initiative. Introduction by Melanie Hart, Director, Social Justice Iniatives at The New School.

This is a joint New School Henry Cohen lecture series and National Economic and Social Rights Initiative Michael Ratner Roundtable series event and part of a larger conversation being advanced through the A New Social Contract Project. The project seeks to build a collective new understanding of ourselves as a country in order to face the challenges revealed as the fragile veneer of our democracy has been pulled back. It also focuses on community and social movement driven solutions to our deepest problems and argues that the many transformative solutions already being practiced at a smaller scale provide the scaffolding for a new social and economic model that can define our future. You can download and read the New Social Contract at www.nesri.org/initiatives/ansc.

Pablo Benson-Silva is Director of Membership and Communications at the New York City Network of Worker Cooperatives (NYC NOWC), the trade association of worker-owned business in the New York metropolitan area and the local affiliate of the USFWC. Born and raised in San Juan Puerto Rico, he moved to the New York City more than a decade ago. He is also a partner at Movement Netlab, a cooperatively governed think-do-learn tank on network social movements. He studied Sociology at the University of Puerto Rico and at the New School for Social Research and more than occasionally dabbles in teaching.

Darrick Hamilton is the director of the doctoral program in public and urban policy, and jointly appointed as professor of economics and urban policy at The Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment and the Department of Economics, The New School for Social Research at The New School in New York.

He is a faculty research fellow at the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at The New School, the immediate past president of the National Economic Association (NEA), an associate director of the Diversity Initiative for Tenure in Economics Program, an associate director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University, and co-principal investigator of the National Asset Scorecard in Communities of Color Project (NASCC). He has authored numerous scholarly articles on socioeconomic stratification in education, marriage, wealth, homeownership, health (including mental health), and labor market outcomes.

He has written for, among others, Atlanta Journal Constitution The American Prospect, Axios, the Christian Science Monitor, Dissent Magazine, Jacobin Magazine, the New York Times, theGrio, the Huffington Post, the Washington Monthly, the Washington Post, and Yes! Magazine.

Melanie F. Hart, Director of Social Justice Initiatives, The New School. Prior to her role with The New School, she served as the Deputy Commissioner of Workforce Development for the New York City Department of Small Business Services. She has also served as the Executive Vice President of Community Programs and Development at the New York City Housing Authority. In addition to her service within New York City agencies, Melanie has served within the nonprofit community. She served as the Chief Program Officer and Interim Executive Director of Legal Information for Families Today (LIFT) to partner with the New York City Family Court system to establish the New York City Family Court Help Centers, where pro se litigants receive free support and legal information to effectively self-advocate in Family Court.

Melanie is a transactional attorney, and served as the Executive Director for the Community Legal Research Network (CLRN) at CUNY School of Law where she helped to develop the framework for the Court Square Legal Project, a partnership between CUNY School of Law and the New York City Bar Association. Melanie’s career has included leadership in NYC government, philanthropy, education, and nonprofit management.

Melanie earned a Bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, a Master’s degree from The New School, and a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Virginia School of Law. Melanie has recently returned to The New School to pursue a PhD in the Public and Urban Policy program with a focus upon race and equity.

Cathy Albisa is co-founder and executive director of National Economic and Social Rights Initiative. She has three decades of experience working to advance racial, gender and economic justice. A constitutional and human rights litigator by training, she gave up the practice of law to found NESRI 15 years ago and work in deep partnership with communities to build social movements for human rights, equity, and genuine democracy here in the United States. Her organization recently launched A New Social Contract: Collective Solutions Built by and for Communities.

Presented by The Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment.

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Event Type

Lectures and Panel Discussions

Audience

General Public

School

Schools of Public Engagement, Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-we-l...

Cost

Free Registration

Hashtag

#HenryCohenLectureSeries

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By Train:
The 4, 5, 6, N, R, Q and L to 14th St./Union Square.
The A, C and E to 14th St. and 8th Ave.
The 1, 2 and 3 to 14th St. and 7th Ave.
The F and M to 14th St. and 6th Ave.
PATH train to 14th St. and 6th Ave.

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