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Kinoscope Film Screening

Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 7:00 pm

Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium, Sheila C. Johnson Design Center 66 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10003

Kinoscope, a screening series sponsored by the School of Media Studies, invites you to the special presentation of genius filmmaker Akira Kurosawa's Ikuru (1952) which will be introduced by Kenji Fujishima, In Review Online editor-in-chief and Slant Magazine film critic.

Kinoscope’s mission is to enhance the awareness and understanding of the film and filmmaking process by screening a wide variety of national and international films. Pawel Wieszczecinski, Kinoscope's  programmer and producer, and School of Media Studies Faculty advisor, Marcus Turner, will discuss the film after the presentation along with the guest speaker, film critic Kenji Fujishima. 

A reception with food and beverages will follow the screening.

About Ikuru (1952)

Considered by some to be Akira Kurosawa’s greatest achievement, Ikiru presents the director at his most compassionate—affirming life through an exploration of a man’s death. Takashi Shimura portrays Kanji Watanabe, an aging bureaucrat with stomach cancer forced to strip the veneer off his existence and find meaning in his final days. Told in two parts, Ikiru offers Watanabe’s quest in the present, and then through a series of flashbacks. The result is a multifaceted look at a life through a prism of perspectives, resulting in a full portrait of a man who lacked understanding from others in life.

About Akira Kurosawa

Arguably the most celebrated Japanese filmmaker of all time, Akira Kurosawa had a career that spanned from the Second World War to the early nineties and that stands as a monument of artistic, entertainment, and personal achievement. His best-known films remain his samurai epics Seven Samurai and Yojimbo, but his intimate dramas, such as Ikiru and High and Low, are just as searing. The first serious phase of Kurosawa’s career came during the postwar era, with Drunken Angel and Stray Dog, gritty dramas about people on the margins of society that featured the first notable appearances by Toshiro Mifune, the director’s longtime leading man. Kurosawa would subsequently gain international fame with Rashomon, a breakthrough in nonlinear narrative and sumptuous visuals. Following a personal breakdown in the late sixties, Kurosawa rebounded by expanding his dark brand of humanism into new stylistic territory, with films such as Kagemusha and Ran, visionary, color, epic ruminations on modern man and nature.

Please note that this event is only open to New School students, faculty, and staff.

Sponsored by The School of Media Studies

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Event Type

Film and Media Screenings

Audience

Students, Faculty, Staff

Division

School of Media Studies, The New School for Public Engagement

Theme

Media and Technology, Creativity and Innovation

Topic

Film

Tags

student work, kinoscope

Cost

Free; no tickets or reservations required; seating is first-come, first-served

Admin Notes

Approved PT

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